Umayyad Caliphate

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Umayyad Caliphate
الخلافة الأموية
Al-Khilāfah al-ʾUmawiyyah (in Arabic)
661–750
Banner o Umad
The Umayyad Caliphate at its greatest extent.
The Umayyad Caliphate at its greatest extent.
Caipital Damascus
(661–744)
Harran
(744–750)
Common leids Arabic (offeecial) – Coptic, Greek, Persie (offeecial in certain regions till the reign o Abd al-Malik) – Aramaic, Armenian, Berber leid, African Romance, Georgian, Turkic, Kurdish, Prakrit
Releegion Sunni Islam
Govrenment Caliphate
Caliph  
• 661–680
Muawiya I
• 744–750
Marwan II
History  
• Muawiya acomes Caliph
661
• Defeat an daith o Marwan II bi the Abbasids
750
Aurie
750 CE (132 AH) 15,000,000 km2 (5,800,000 sq mi)
Population
• 750 CE (132 AH)
34000000
Currency Gowd dinar an dirham
Precedit bi
Succeedit bi
Rashidun Caliphate
Byzantine Empire
Visigothic Kinrick
Abbasid Caliphate
Emirate o Córdoba
The day pairt o

The Umayyad Caliphate (Arabic: الخلافة الأموية‎, trans. Al-Khilāfat al-ʾumawiyya) wis the seicont o the fower major Islamic caliphates established efter the faith o Muhammad.

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. "The Umayyads ruled for ninety years, taking white as their symbolic color as a reminder of the Prophet's first battle at Badr, and to distinguish themselves from the Abbasids, by using white, rather than black, as their color of mourning." Abdul Hadi, Evolution of the Arab Flag, 1986. "With its white flag, the Chinese Tang Dynasty referred to it [the Umayyad Dynasty] in historical literature as ' Baiyi Dashi,' the 'White Garment Calips.'" Li Qingxin, Maritime Silk Road, trans. W. W. Wang (2006), p. 47.
  2. The Peoples, Sekene Mody Cissoko, History of Humanity:From the Seventh to the Sixteenth Century, Vol. IV, ed. M.A. Al-Bakhit, L. Bazin and S.M. Cissoko, (UNESCO, 2008), 1190.[1]
  3. Jonathan Miran, Red Sea Citizens: Cosmopolitan Society and Cultural Change in Massawa, (Indiana University Press, 2009), 100.[2]
  4. Khalid Yahya Blankinship, The End of the Jihad State: The Reign of Hisham Ibn 'Abd al-Malik and the Collapse of the Umayyads, (SUNY Press, 1994), 286.[3]
  5. Khalid Yahya Blankinship, The End of the Jihad State: The Reign of Hisham Ibn 'Abd al-Malik and the Collapse of the Umayyads, 147.[4]
  6. Stefan Goodwin, Africas Legacies Of Urbanization: Unfolding Saga of a Continent, (Rowman & Littlefield, 2006), 85.[5]
  7. Islam in Somali History:Fact and Fiction, Mohamed Haji Muktar, The Invention of Somalia, ed. Ali Jimale Ahmed, (The Red Sea Press, Inc., 1995), 3.[6]