Uiser:Jamie Stuart 11/sandbox

Frae Wikipedia, the free beuk o knawledge
Jump to navigation Jump to search


Aylmer Maxwell [1]

Metal sculpture of the "Resurrected Christ" by Liverpool artist Arthur Dooley (1929-1994) formerly on the sanctuary wall at the now closed Church of the Resurrection in Gatehouse of Fleet, now installed at St Andrew and St Cuthbert Church in Kirkcudbright.  

Statue of "Our Lady" by Liverpool artist Arthur Dooley (1929-1994) formerly on the sanctuary wall at the now closed Church of the Resurrection in Gatehouse of Fleet, now installed at St Andrew and St Cuthbert Church in Kirkcudbright.

Metal sculptures of the "Resurrected Christ" and "Our Lady" by Liverpool artist Arthur Dooley (1929-1994) formerly on the sanctuary wall at the now closed Church of the Resurrection in Gatehouse of Fleet, now installed at St Andrew and St Cuthbert Church in Kirkcudbright.



"Filmography" is a generic tern and we don't use the word "Televisionography". Do you have an alternative suggestion? Thanks. Martinevans123 (talk) 18:44, 15 February 2020 (UTC) Oeuvre perhaps? All the best: Rich Farmbrough (the apparently calm and reasonable) 22:41, 15 February 2020 (UTC). Wow, that sounds bit grand. What about just "Television" as the main heading? Martinevans123 (talk) 23:50, 15 February 2020 (UTC) Reply

I feel it's a misnomer to use "Filmography" for performers not involved in the "film" industry and that a better term should be found for performers in television, more accurate and more specific to avoid confusion.


Simplified Italianate style but still displaying the three typical Italianate features: a prominently bracketed cornice, a tower based on an Italian campanile and belvederi, and arched windows.



Ni

DIRECTOR Nick comes from a musical family and studied mime in Paris with Jacques Lecoq. He began directing for theatre, then for television with films like The Interrogation of John, much of the BBC hit Hamish Macbeth starring Robert Carlyle, Far From the Madding Crowd, Andrew Davies’ adaptation of Wives and Daughters, and Uncle Adolf, Nigel Williams’ take on Hitler’s affair with Geli, his niece.


The Russian Bride with Lia Williams, Guy Hibbert’s modern version of Therèse Raquin, won FIPA Prix D’Or in Biarritz.  After making A Room with a View for TV with Elaine Cassidy, he was in Dublin to shoot an off-beat rom-com Little White Lie, in which she starred with Andrew Scott, and When Harvey Met Bob with Domhnall Gleeson and Ian Hart, the story of Bob Geldof and Harvey Goldsmith bringing LiveAid to Wembley. And later, three stories in the BBC’s Musketeers series.


He directed several of Clare Norburn’s concert-dramas Gesualdo - Breaking the Rules for The Marian Consort, The Empowered Women Trilogy for The Telling, and Creating Carmen for Carmen Co.

Children of Lavinia Joan Lascelles and Major Edward Westland Renton[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Nicholas John Renton+1b. 1946
  • Simon AnthonyRenton+1 b. 1948

Citations[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. [S37] BP2003 volume 2, page 1787. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]

Have you any information about a burial ground located on the edge of Laurieston village? It is situated behind the village hall on a slight elevation. Local knowledge has it that it is connected to the Laurie or Lawrie, in some spellings, family of Laurieston Hall, Woodhall estate and that inscribed on a stone is the word "negro". The location is marked on maps as a 'tomb', the earliest I have been able to find is a map dated 1821 on the National Library of Scotland maps site. I have been unable to find any other written references or documentation.

Would you be able to investigate please?

I think the co-ordinates are 59.9597751, -4.06020661.

The last Mass was celebrated on Christmas Day 1585 and the last provost left in about 1590 with ownership passing to the Catholic Maxwell family of nearby Terregles House.

Thomas Pennant in his "A Tour of Scotland and Voyage to the Hebrides" in 1772 wrote, (of Princess Margaret's tomb ) " her bones till lately, were scattered about in a most indecent manner by some wretches who broke open the repository in search of treasure."

In 1882 the owner Capt Maxwell of Terregles had the ruins cleaned up and fenced off and a caretaker installed in a lodge house on site. In 1922 the ruins were taken into state care.

In recent years the ruins have again suffered from vandalism. It was reported that used engine oil had been poured over the effigy of Princess Margaret. Following this incident the effigy was removed in 1999 for conservation and protection and replaced with a fibreglass replica.



In 1970 another change in government control was followed by the publication of a white paper in 1971 implementing the commission's reforms in a modified form. The abolition of counties "for local government purposes" was enacted by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, with counties playing no part in local government after 16 May 1975, being replaced by regions and districts.


The Church of the Resurrection Gatehouse of Fleet, Kirkcudbrightshire closed with the last Mass being celebrated on the 1st February 2020 led by the Bishop of Galloway, William Nolan with the parish priest the Rev William McFadden.

The metal sculptures of the Resurrected Christ and the statue of Our Lady, by the Liverpool sculptor and artist Arthur Dooley (1929-1994) formerly on the sanctuary wall have been installed at St Andrew and St Cuthbert Church in Kirkcudbright.



[2] The Swallows is an artwork created in willow



Church of the Resurrection, 1971 designed by Sutherland, Dickie & Copland. The church is lit by a dramatic clerestory window. Metal sculptures of the Resurrected Christ and Our Lady by Liverpool artist Arthur Dooley (1929-1994) on the sanctuary wall. [2] The Swallows is an artwork created in willow by local artist Lizzie Farey and was a memorial commission. [3] The last Mass was celebrated on the 1st February 2020 by the Bishop of Galloway, William Nolan and parish priest Rev Fr William McFadden. The church will be demolished and the site sold for housing.[1]


. Fr Michael Lynch parish priest of St Andrews and St Cuthbert Catholic church in Kirkcudbright was instrumental in building the Church of the Resurrection in Gatehouse of Fleet, Kirkcudbrightshire, which opened in November 1971.


Catholic Church Whithorn

St Martin and St Ninian Catholic Church, George St, Whithorn, Wigtownshire, 1959-60. Architect Harry Stuart Goodheart-Rendel, (1887-1959) his only known building in Scotland. The interior has seen some reordering with the moving forward of the altar from the East wall after the Second Vatican Council. At that time the baldacchino was demolished, together with the removal of the altar rail and decorative ironwork. The original Creetown granite altar was moved outside and placed against the eastern elevation. The East elevation has a carved Hew Lorimer crucifix mounted to wall.

1966) mar. (2) 8 Jan 1916 Susanna Mary Borthwick (widow of Archibald Patrick Thomas [Borthwick], 20th Lord Borthwick; b. 1 Apr 1878; d. 3 Oct 1961), 4th dau. of Sir Mark John MacTaggart Stewart, 1st Bt., by his wife Marianne Susanna Ommaney, only child of John Orde Ommaney children by second wife 3. Lady Elfrida Marie Susanna FitzRoy (b. 15 Mar 1919; d. 4 Jan 1920) 4. Lady Cecilia Blanche Genevieve FitzRoy (b. 13 May 1922; d. 8 Feb 1974), mar. 11 May 1949 George Anthony Geoffrey Howard (later a Life Peer as Baron Howard of Henderskelfe), only surv. son of Hon Geoffrey Howard, of Castle Howard, co. York, and had issue died 10 Jan 1930 suc by grandson


Culgruff House, Crossmichael, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland. Baronial style mansion of 1889, has been attributed in 2018 to architectural drawings to architect Charles William Stephens, red sandstone, 2 storeys with attics and tall square tower. Above entrance door the inscription "God's Providence is Mine Inheritance" and date of 1889. Built for Robert Stewart of Southwick who married Georgina Eleanor Maxwell daughter of Sir William Maxwell 3rd baronet of Cardoness. Is listed as Category B.


Traditionally Mary, Queen of Scots is said to have lodged at the House of Fuffnock on the Crossmichael Road, now part of Abercromby Road on the edge of Castle Douglas in Kirkcudbrightshire, on her journey to Port Mary in 1568 after the Battle of Langside.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 04, 2010 8:38 am Post subject: Capt Cuninghame - Castle Douglas Reply with quote not listed on UKNIWM

Location in the former St John's church (deconsecrated) Castle Douglas at OS Map Ref NX 762 623.

There are two identical memorials in this former Roman Catholic church to the Cuninghames who were benefactors of the church. This is the only one with mention of military service and there are no other memorials of interest in the building. It is expected that these two memorials will shortly be moved to St Andrew and St Cuthberts RC church in Kirkcudbright which is where worship now takes place. The first photograph is of St John's church.

Erected by the congregation on the jubilee of the church 3rd December 1917 in loving and grateful memory of their munificent benefactor Captain Richard Dunning Barre Cuninghame who died 3rd January 1917

I have found nothing on Capt Cuninghame so I presume he was too old to be serving in WW1. Further information would be welcome.

A quick search in UKNIWM for Cuninghame reveals



PTE. WILLIAM BRANNEY, CANADIANS. William Branney – age 44 – Private (65108) 24th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. William was brought up in New Luce, Wigtownshire and was an apprentice plasterer in Newton Stewart in 1891. He, and his brothers James (a blacksmith) and John (a joiner) who had just returned from South Africa, sailed from Liverpool to New York in August 1904. William was working at his trade when he enlisted in Montreal in October 1914 and he sailed from there in May 1915. He joined his battalion in France in September 1915 but died of heart failure in the following April. Born 1872 in Stranraer, Wigtownshire. Son of the late Thomas and Margaret (Phillips) Branney. He named his brother Thomas of 38 Munches Street, Dumfries as his next of kin. A sister, Agnes (Branney) Mrs. Lawrence Collins lived at 74 High Street, Kirkcudbright. Died on Active Service on 29 April 1916 and buried in Voormezeele Enclosures No.1 and No.2, Belgium. Also named on the St. Cuthbert's Church Memorial in Kirkcudbright.


PTE.FRANK P. KENNEDY, A. and S. H. Frank Kennedy – age 23 – Private (890) 10th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Frank was brought up in Kirkcudbright with his brother William. He enlisted in 1914 and joined his brother, who was already serving with the 1st Argylls, and they landed with the battalion at Le Havre in December 1914. They both were wounded in June 1915 and Frank visited Kirkcudbright in July before he joined the 10th Argylls at the front. Born 1892 in Glasgow. Son of the late William and Mary (McGuire) Kennedy of 38 James Street, Calton, Glasgow. In 1901 Frank, age 7, and William, age 9, were “boarders” with Michael and Mary Gavigan of High Street, Kirkcudbright. Missing in Action on 15 October 1915 and named on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Also named on the St. Cuthbert's Church Memorial in Kirkcudbright.


PTE. William McCormack NEW ZEALAND CONTINGENT. William McCormick – age 33 – Private (10/2216) Wellington Regiment, N.Z.E.F. In 1891 William, aged 9, was living with his grandparents Connell and Mary McCormick in Kirkcudbright. He enlisted as Private (9833) in the Royal Marine Light Infantry in August 1898 and spent five years on service and another five in the Reserve. He was working as a shearer and was living at 165 Owen Street, Wellington, New Zealand when he enlisted in February 1914. He sailed from Wellington in June 1915 and joined his battalion at Gallipoli in August but was killed on the same day. Born 1882 in Kirkcudbright. Son of Elizabeth McCormick of Kirkcudbright and of David Gibson of Borgue. He named his sister Margaret (McCormick) Watson of Union Street, Kirkcudbright as his next of kin. Missing in Action on 11 August 1915 and named on the Chunuk Bair (New Zealand) Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey. Also named on the St. Cuthbert's Church Memorial in Kirkcudbright.


PTE. CHARLES McMILLAN, K.O.S.B. Charles McMillan – age 20 – Private (241305) 9th Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) Charles was employed at Cuil Farm, Buittle, Kirkcudbrightshire and was a member of the Castle Douglas company of the Territorial 5th King's Own Scottish Borderers. As Private (1493) he landed with his battalion at Gallipoli in June 1915 and was wounded on 12 July at Achi Baba. Later he contracted dysentery and was evacuated home. When he recovered he was transferred to the Highland Light Infantry but he was posted to the Black Watch. Born 1896 in Kirkcudbright. Son of James and Margaret (Milligan) McMillan of 62 High Street, Kirkcudbright. Missing in Action on 31 July 1917 and named on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Also named on the St. Cuthbert's Church Memorial in Kirkcudbright


SGT. JOHN McNULTY, D.C.M., M.M., ROYAL SCOTS. John McNulty, Distinguished Conduct Medal – age 28 – Lance Sergeant (12045) 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers. John was the adopted son of William McMillan of 101 High Street, Kirkcudbright and of Garscube Road in Glasgow. He was educated at the St. Cuthbert's Roman Catholic School before, at the age of 14, he moved with his family to Dalmellington and then to Glasgow. He joined his battalion in France in November 1914 and was awarded a DCM “For conspicuous gallantry and ability on the 16th-17th May 1915, at Festubert. He first took over the platoon duties of his Sergeant, and subsequently those of his platoon Officer, who was wounded, and by his courage and ability he held his platoon together most successfully, and conducted their retirement. Subsequently, he went forward some 300 yards, and attended to his wounded Officer under a very severe fire.” He was also awarded a Medal of St. George, 3rd class, by the Russian Czar. Born c.1888 in Glasgow. Son of the late John and Sarah (McGill) McNulty. Husband of Catherine (Burns) McNulty of 8 Gayfield Street, Glasgow who he married in 1915 in Milton, Glasgow when he was a Corporal in the 2nd RSF. Killed in Action on 2 July 1916 and buried in Dantzig Alley British Cemetery, Mametz, Somme, France. Also named on the St. Cuthbert's Church Memorial in Kirkcudbright and on the Glasgow Roll of Honour.




.............................

History of Forneth The plot of land was originally part of Kilmichael and was ‘disponed’ to William McDonald, brewer of Castle Douglas, by Captain Archibald Black in 1872 for the construction of a ‘good and substantial villa or dwelling house’. All outbuildings to be constructed were also to be of a good and substantial nature with a slated roof and, as soon as the Crossmichael Road became a street, the section along the front of the property was to be paved. The extent of the plot was 3 acres & three roods and it was surveyed by Alexander Mc Michael, land measurer. The lands to the east and north remained part of Kilmichael while the Feu to the Castle Douglas side (Rock Park) was owned by Mr A.Dobie. Entry date was Martinmas 1872 and an annual feu of £24 and 10s was to be paid each Whitsuntide. The document was dated 21st December 1872.

Unfortunately, William McDonald died in 1874 with the house only partly built and the property was willed to his son John William McDonald. He borrowed £450 from his mother Jane Young Tennant McDonald in order to complete construction. He was also a brewer and lived in the property until it was sold, on 25th November 1885, for £1000 to Miss Jane Greig.

Jane Greig appears to have been a maiden lady living on a small and fixed income. She nevertheless maintained a pony and a servant (Annie Johnstone). She also benefited from the assistance of her nephew, Frank Eveline Greig, an importer and exporter resident in Birmingham. He inherited the house in 1917 upon the death of his aunt. She had stipulated that the house and its contents were to remain together with the upkeep supplied by the interest from her will. As little as possible (a clock and a sword) were to pass to one T.H. Greig, perhaps her brother, and the pony was to be shot ! The bequest not withstanding, it appeared that some investment was necessary to improve the property and Frank Greig borrowed £200 from Miss Lilian Mary Cornell of Tranvancore, Southern India. This was repaid in 1919 prior to the sale of Forneth for £1175 to Hugh Walter Boyd Crawford of Chapmanton.

When Hugh Crawford died in 1935, Chapmanton passed to his son, Walter Craig Crawford. The family also farmed at Caigton and his widow, Janet Leiper Crawford (nee Craig) moved to Dungarry in Castle Douglas. The boundaries of Forneth changed at this time with the sub-plot of 48 square poles and 15 sq yds being divided off and a right of way from Abercromby Road to the back of the stables being assigned to the Crawfords by Mrs Jessie Allan (nee Thomson) who had been the proprietrix of Kilmichael and now lived at Benaire, Ernespie Rd.

The new owner, Patrick Gifford, solicitor of Castle Douglas, bought the property for £1500 on 27th May 1935. The Gifford’s son, also Patrick, worked in partnership with his father in the town law practice. He joined the Auxilliary Air Force and, upon the outbreak of war, was serving with 603 squadron. He rose to the rank of Squadron Leader and was awarded the DFC after shooting down the first German aircraft of the war on 16th October 1939. He was killed in action over Flanders in May 1940. His body was never found but his name was added to the memorial plaque in StNinians Church in 2004. His sisters are believed to be Gwendolen Alma Moncreiff and Helene Audrey Gifford. The former had married Frederick Moncreiff and lived at Newlands, c/o Eldorado Post Office, Southern Rhodesia and £300 was bequeathed to the latter to travel to Africa, should she wish to join her sister.

The house was bought by Dr John Moffat and he moved from #1, St Andrew Street, Castle Douglas. He owned the house for 23 years until April 1972 when he sold to Agnes Hamilton of West End Garage, Springholm. Mrs Hamilton was reportedly associated with Garland Construction of Dumfries who bought the property in 1973 after the Hamilton’s had split-off the plot of land containing the stables (which was later to also include # 43 and #45 Abercromby Rd). Garland built the Castle View properties and sold-off the main house to Albert and Barbara Charteris. They, in turn, sold to Alistair Hamilton and he sold, almost immediately, to Nathan Davidson. The Davidsons bought the house in 1976. During these complicated transactions, the feuhold of Forneth had been bought-out by Mrs Agnes Hamilton for £228 from Grace Lusk Allan, formerly of Benaire and benefactor of the Kilmichael estates. Nathan Davidson transferred Forneth to his, then, wife Caroline Davidson in February 1980 and she sold it to Mark and Lesley Wainwright thirteen years later. Lesley ran the successful launderette business 'Domestique' from the premises between 2001 and 2007.


History

The plot of land was originally part of Kilmichael and was ‘disponed’ to William McDonald, brewer of Castle Douglas, by Captain Archibald Black in 1872 for the construction of a ‘good and substantial villa or dwelling house’. All outbuildings to be constructed were also to be of a good and substantial nature with a slated roof and, as soon as the Crossmichael Road became a street, the section along the front of the property was to be paved. The extent of the plot was 3 acres & three roods and it was surveyed by Alexander Mc Michael, land measurer. The lands to the east and north remained part of Kilmichael while the Feu to the Castle Douglas side (Rock Park) was owned by Mr A.Dobie. Entry date was Martinmas 1872 and an annual feu of £24 and 10s was to be paid each Whitsuntide. The document was dated 21st December 1872.

Unfortunately, William McDonald died in 1874 with the house only partly built and the property was willed to his son John William McDonald. He borrowed £450 from his mother Jane Young Tennant McDonald in order to complete construction. He was also a brewer and lived in the property until it was sold, on 25th November 1885, for £1000 to Miss Jane Greig.

Jane Greig appears to have been a maiden lady living on a small and fixed income. She nevertheless maintained a pony and a servant (Annie Johnstone). She also benefited from  the assistance of her nephew, Frank Eveline Greig, an importer and exporter resident in Birmingham. He inherited the house in 1917 upon the death of his aunt. She had stipulated that the house and its contents were to remain together with the upkeep supplied by the interest from her will. As little as possible (a clock and a sword) were to pass to one T.H. Greig, perhaps her brother, and the pony was to be shot ! The bequest not withstanding, it appeared that some investment was necessary to improve the property and Frank Greig borrowed £200 from Miss Lilian Mary Cornell of Tranvancore, Southern India. This was repaid in 1919 prior to the sale of Forneth for £1175 to Hugh Walter Boyd Crawford of Chapmanton.

When Hugh Crawford died in 1935, Chapmanton passed to his son, Walter Craig Crawford. The family also farmed at Caigton and his widow, Janet Leiper Crawford (nee Craig) moved to Dungarry in Castle Douglas. The boundaries of Forneth changed at this time with the sub-plot of 48 square poles and 15 sq yds being divided off and a right of way from Abercromby Road to the back of the stables being assigned to the Crawfords by Mrs Jessie Allan (nee Thomson) who had been the proprietrix of Kilmichael and now lived at Benaire, Ernespie Rd.

The new owner, Patrick Gifford, solicitor of Castle Douglas, bought the property for £1500 on 27th May 1935. The Gifford’s son, also Patrick, worked in partnership with his father in the town law practice. He joined the Auxilliary Air Force and, upon the outbreak of war, was serving with 603 squadron. He rose to the rank of Squadron Leader and was awarded the DFC after shooting down the first German aircraft of the war on 16th October 1939. He was killed in action over Flanders in May 1940. His body was never found but his name was added to the memorial plaque in StNinians Church in 2004. His sisters are believed to be Gwendolen Alma Moncreiff and Helene Audrey Gifford. The former had married Frederick Moncreiff and lived at Newlands, c/o Eldorado Post Office, Southern Rhodesia and £300 was bequeathed to the latter to travel to Africa, should she wish to join her sister.

The house was bought by Dr John Moffat and he moved from #1, St Andrew Street, Castle Douglas. He owned the house for 23 years until April 1972 when he sold to Agnes Hamilton of West End Garage, Springholm.  Mrs Hamilton was reportedly associated with Garland Construction of Dumfries who bought the property in 1973 after the Hamilton’s had split-off the plot of land containing the stables (which was later to also include # 43 and #45 Abercromby Rd). Garland built the Castle View properties and sold-off the main house to Albert and Barbara Charteris. They, in turn, sold to Alistair Hamilton and he sold, almost immediately, to Nathan Davidson. The Davidsons bought the house in 1976. During these complicated transactions, the feuhold of Forneth had been bought-out by Mrs Agnes Hamilton for £228 from Grace Lusk Allan, formerly of Benaire and benefactor of the Kilmichael estates. Nathan Davidson transferred Forneth to his, then,  wife Caroline Davidson in February 1980 and she sold it to Mark and Lesley Wainwright thirteen years later. Lesley ran the successful launderette business 'Domestique' from the premises between 2001 and 2007.

But still demand flagged for northern properties. Placing managers on al his stations Stewart went home in 1874 when he married Georgina Eeanor Maxwell, third daughter of Sir William Maxwell, Bart., of Cardoness on Wigtown Bay. Thereafter he moved regularly between Scotland and Queensland and finally, in 1881, he sold Telemon, Marathon and Southwick. This trip meant he missed the 1880 elections and his pobable political career, but, as he'd always planned, his stations fetched premium prices.22 Back in Queensland yet again in 1887 he sold his remaining station Fairlight,23 so that finally Robert Stewart could retire home to Scotland.

Back in Kirkcudbrightshire the Stewarts lived first at Glenlaggan, near Parton on the River Dee, from whence Robert could orchestrate his next key project: construction of their grand country house. In 1883 he had purchased Culgruff, an estate near the village of Crossmichael, and a mere 30km. north-west from the family seat at Southwick. Here he built Culgruff House, a three-storied 'noble mansion-house' complete with turreted tower, set amidst gardens and wooded grounds and with fine views over nearby Loch Key and Crossmichael on the River Dee. Quite the most striking room in the house was the morning room, with stained glass windows and vaulted ceiling above walls of double height and here on prominent display was hung Stewart's collection of Aboriginal artefacts.

Robert settled readily into the guise of the Scottish squire, assuming innumerable public offices; he supported charities, the school, the Church and various sporting groups and was a regular at the local cattle mart, dealing in stock and dispensing advice. It was in December 1902 during a visit to Southwick to attend the funeral of his sister, Mary, that he contracted pneumonia and, on December 27th, he died at Southwick House. He was 66. Buried at St Michael's Church, Crossmichael, some recalled his 'brusque and impulsive manner' but generally locals lamented him as a 'shrewd, intelligent, kindly-hearted laird'.24 'Shrewd' seems fair comment, for beyond Culgruff and associated tenant farms, his estate included an impressive portfolio of international bank and share investments and was valued at £85,000.25 A very shrewd Scottish second son indeed.

St Peter's seminary is a disused Roman Catholic seminary near Cardross, Argyll, Scotland. Designed by th' firm o' Gillespie, Kidd & Coia, it haes bin described by th' international architecture conservation organisation docomomo as a modern "building o' world significance".[1] it's yin o' ainlie 42 post-war buildings in bonnie scotland tae be listed at category a, th' hi'est level o' protection fur a building o' "special architectural or historic interest".[2][3] it haes bin abandoned sin 1987, 'n' is currently in a ruinous state. 'twas announced in earlie 2015 that th' site hud bin handed ower tae artist angus farquhar, wi' th' intention that pairt o'  



Fotografato mentre seminarista presso il seminario cattolico, il Pontificio Collegio Scozzese a Roma nel 1889-90.

Fotografato mentre seminarista presso il seminario cattolico, il Pontificio Collegio Scozzese a Roma nel 1889-90.


Frederick William Rolfe, meglio noto come "Barone Corvo", (1860 -1913), era uno scrittore, artista e fotografo inglese. Fotografato mentre seminarista presso il seminario cattolico, il Pontificio Collegio Scozzese a Roma nel 1889-90.



Frederick William Rolfe, better known as "Baron Corvo", (22 July 1860 – 25 October 1913), was an English writer, artist and photographer. Photographed while a seminarian at the Catholic seminary, The Pontifical Scots College in Rome in 1889-90.


vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv

William Wilson (1905 – 1972) wis a Scots stained gless artist, printmaker an watercolour painter. He wis a member o the Royal Scots Academy. He wis appointed an OBE.


Fair use in The High Life 1994 (TV series) Though this image is subject to copyright, its use is covered by the U.S. fair use laws because:

  1. It's a low resolution copy of a Film Poster / VHS or DVD Cover.
  2. It doesn't limit the copyright owner's rights to sell the film in any way, in fact, it may encourage sales.
  3. Because of the low resolution, copies could not be used to make illegal copies of the artwork/image.
  4. The image is itself a subject of discussion in the article or used in the infobox thereof.
  5. The image is significant because it was used to promoted a notable film.

vvvvbvvvbbbbbbnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

This image is the cover of a videotape, DVD, Blu-ray, etc. and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the video or the studio which produced the video in question. It is believed that the use of low-resolution images of video covers

qualifies as fair use under the Copyright law of the United States. Any other uses of this image, on Wikipedia or elsewhere, may be copyright infringement. See Wikipedia:Non-free content for more information.


hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

≠≠[eedit | eedit soorce]

The High Life is a Scottish situation comedy written by and starring Forbes Masson as Steve McCracken and Alan Cumming as Sebastian Flight. Cumming and Masson met at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama and united after several solo projects to create the theatrical BBC sitcom, The High Life. The two leads were based heavily on their famous Scottish comedy alter-egos, Victor and Barry.[2]

The series followed the cabin crew at the fictional airline, Air Scotia, flying out of Prestwick Airport. The crew consisted of the camp, alcohol-loving, narcissistic and vindictive steward, Sebastian; his sex-obsessed colleague Steve; their up-tight, antagonistic chief stewardess, Shona Spurtle; and the eccentric pilot, Captain Hilary Duff.

Sebastian and Steve longed to be promoted to long-haul flights to see exotic locations, instead of the current short-haul trips with their superior Shona, played by Siobhan Redmond, whom they described as 'Hitler in tights', 'Mussolini in Micromesh' and 'Goebbels in a Gossard'. The deranged pilot, Captain Duff, played by Patrick Ryecart, would need to be frequently reminded who he was, where the cockpit was and where he was flying to.

The High Life was interspersed with surrealism, childish humour, sarcasm and theatrical song and dance numbers. It only ran for one series due to Cumming's increasingly successful film career in Hollywood; however during an interview, Masson claims that a second

Culgruff House, baronial style mansion o 1889, designed by architect Charles William Stephens, the architect o Harrods Department store in Lunnon, biggit in red sandstane, 2 storeys wi attics an a tower. Aboon the entrance door the inscription "God's Providence is Mine Inheritance" 'an date o 1889. Biggit bi the laird Robert Stewart o Southwick wha merrit Georgina Eleanor Maxwell daughter o Sir William Maxwell 3rd baronet o Cardoness. Fae 1947 tae 2015 in uise as a hotel. Is listed as Category B.


Relief of the Genii Cucullati (hooded deities) found in a shrine in the vicus, early 3rd century AD, Housesteads Roman Fort (Vercovicium) (44588550041)





Scenografia di "Rome" - panoramio.jpg



venuto Gesù e aveva fame>>.

New York Street-1
Anita Garibaldi Photo BW
Beeld van Giuseppe Garibaldi te Rome, vermoedelijk bezocht tijdens een verlofreis vanuit Nederlands-Indië naar Nederland of vice versa.
Knockreoch Bridge. - geograph.org.uk - 526737


Glasgow Prestwick Airport, January 2017

The High Life (1994 TV series)


The High Life is a Scots situation comedy written bi an starring Forbes Masson as Steve McCracken an Alan Cumming as Sebastian Flight. Cumming an Masson met at the Royal Scots Academy of Music and Drama in Glesga an efter loads o solo projects tae create the theatrical BBC sitcom, The High Life. The twa leads wur based heavily oan thair Scots comedy alter-egos, Victor an Barry.

Reverted good faith edits by Vampibite. Catholic churches ur nivver kent as "kirks" in Scotland.



This photograph is copyrighted and is NOT under a free license. However, it is believed that the use of this work in the article "Ian Harvey":












.

Cumnock

William Burges 1881-82. Early Decorated. 4-bay nave with

aisles and long-apsed chancel orientated S, unfinished SE

tower, containing organ chamber, lean-to timber vestibule at

N. gable; droved coursers, double-pitched parallel roofs over

nave and aisles. N. gable has plate tracery rose window N.

gable, 2 light windows at aisles trefoil headed windows on

the flanks. Interior: low cylindrical piers, capitals uncut,

kingpost roof with upper area boarded as waggon roof;

arcaded wall treatment of apse windows with shaft rings,

spandrels of chancel arch mural-painted, fine boarded ceiling

in apse; modern granite pulpit and altar, altarpiece by J F

Bentley executed N J Westlake in E. aisle, rich late gothic

triptych. Stained glass in apse by Westlake 1884.





Cruggleton Church - geograph.org.uk - 1282501








Are vanished all — yet blessed I hope thou art,

For in thy station thou hast played thy part.”




  • Samuel Robinson (1786-1875) was from Wigtown. His account of his life on a slave ship, ' A Sailor Boy's Experience Aboard a Slave Ship ', was published in Hamilton, Lanarkshire, in 1867.


John Newlands [1] [2]





Johnston School, Kirkcudbright - view from NW













1957 RC Church of St Mary of the Assumption Aberdeen Scotland Alterations to adapt Cathedral to modern liturgical requirements
1960s RC Church Corstorphine Edinburgh Scotland
1960s RC Church Mastrick Aberdeen Scotland
1960s RC Church Dalmellington Ayrshire Scotland
1960s St Edward's RC Church Airdrie Lanarkshire Scotland
1960s St Serf's RC Church Airdrie Lanarkshire Scotland
1960 Our Lady of Mount Carmel RC Church Kilmarnock Ayrshire Scotland
1960 St Joseph RC Church Catrine Ayrshire Scotland
1960 St Paul RC Church Hurlford Ayrshire Scotland Alterations to church
1963 Our Lady of Lourdes and St Patrick RC Church Auchinleck Ayrshire Scotland Church
c. 1963 St Xavier RC Church Carfin Lanarkshire Scotland
1965 St Francis Xavier RC Church Waterside Ayrshire Scotland Addition of porch
1966 St Paul RC Church Hurlford Ayrshire Scotland Presbytery - may have been responsible
1969 St Martin of Tours RC Church Tranent East Lothian Scotland
1970 RC Church Clarkston Glasgow Scotland
1970 West Lothian Scotland
West Lothian Scotland Begun by








Richard Dunning Barré Cunningham(1836-1916), Landowner and army officer


  1. http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/warmemscot-post-68929.html
  2. "Mr Fibble Talks To... Forbes Masson". reddwarf.co.uk. 2004-03-05. Retrieved 2008-11-02.