Delhi Sultanate

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Delhi Sultanate
پادشاهی دهلی
1206–1526
Banner o Delhi Sultanate
Banner o Delhi Sultanate accordin tae the Catalan Atlas
Delhi Sultanate unner various dynasties.
Delhi Sultanate unner various dynasties.
Caipital Delhi (1206–1210)
Badayun (1210–1214)
Delhi (1214–1327)
Daulatabad (1327–1334)
Delhi (1334–1506)
Agra (1506–1526)
Common leids Persie (offeecial),[1] Hindavi (since 1451)[2]
Releegion Sunni Islam
Govrenment Sultanate
Sultan  
• 1206–1210
Qutb-ud-din Aibak (first)
• 1517–1526
Ibrahim Lodi (last)
Historical era Middle Ages
12 Juin 1206
20 December 1305
21 Aprile 1526
Precedit bi
Succeedit bi
Ghurid dynasty
Vaghela dynasty
Gahadavala
Chandela
Paramara dynasty
Deva dynasty
Seuna (Yadava) dynasty
Mughal Empire
The day pairt o  Afghanistan
 Bangladesh
 Indie
 Pakistan
   Nepal

The Delhi Sultanate wis a Muslim kinrick based maistly in Delhi that stretched ower lairge parts of the Indian subcontinent for 320 years (1206–1526).[4][5] Five dynasties ruled ower Delhi Sultanate sequentially, the first fower o which war o Turkic origin: the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90); the Khilji dynasty (1290–1320); the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414);[6] the Sayyid dynasty (1414–51); an the Afghan Lodi dynasty (1451–1526).

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. "Arabic and Persian Epigraphical Studies - Archaeological Survey of India". Asi.nic.in. 
  2. Alam, Muzaffar (1998). "The pursuit of Persian: Language in Mughal Politics". Modern Asian Studies. Cambridge University Press. 32 (2): 317–349. doi:10.1017/s0026749x98002947. Hindavi was recognized as a semi-official language by the Sor Sultans (1540-55) and their chancellery rescripts bore transcriptions in the Devanagari script of the Persian contents. The practice is said to have been introduced by the Lodis (1451-1526). 
  3. Jackson, Peter (16 October 2003). The Delhi Sultanate: A Political and Military History. Cambridge University Press. p. 28. ISBN 978-0-521-54329-3. 
  4. Delhi Sultanate, Encyclopedia Britannica
  5. A. Schimmel, Islam in the Indian Subcontinent, Leiden, 1980
  6. Sen, Sailendra (2013). A Textbook of Medieval Indian History. Primus Books. pp. 68–102. ISBN 978-9-38060-734-4.