Wahhabi

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Wahhabism is a wird uised tae describe Salafism, a releegious muivement athin Sunni Islam[1] an a branch[2] o Islam. It wis developit bi an 18t century Muslim theologian (Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab) (1703–1792) frae Najd, Saudi Arabie. Ibn Abdul Al-Wahhab advocatit purgin Islam o wha he considered tae be impurities an innovations. It is the dominant form o Islam in Saudi Arabie.[3] Its adherents prefer tae be cried Salafis.

The muivement claims tae adhere tae the correct unnerstaundin o the general Islamic doctrine o Tawhid, the Uniqueness an Unity o God, shared bi the majority o Islamic sects, but uniquely interpretit bi Abdul Al-Wahhab .[4] Ibn Abd-al-Wahhab wis influencit bi the writins o Ibn Taymiyya an questioned classical interpretations o Islam, claimin tae rely on the Qur'an an the Hadith.[4] He attacked a "perceived moral decline an poleetical weakness" in the Arabie Peninsulae an condemned what he perceivit as idolatry, the popular cult o saunts, an shrine an tomb visitation.[4]

The terms Wahhabi an Salafi (as well as ahl al-hadith, fowk o hadith) are aften uised interchyngeably, but Wahhabi haes an aw been cried "a pairticular orientation athin Salafism",[2] an orientation some consider ultra-conservative an heretical.[5][6]

Accordin tae Riadh Sidaoui, habitual uise o the term Wahhabism is scientifically false, an the concept o Saudi Wahhabism shoud be substitutit. Indeed, it is an Islamic doctrine which is based on the historical alliance atween the poleetical an financial pouer representit bi Ibn Saud an the releegious authority representit bi Abdul Al-Wahhab, the doctrine continues tae exist tae this day thanks tae this alliance, the financin o several releegious channels an the formation o several sheikhs.[7]

See an aw[eedit | eedit soorce]

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. "Wahhābī". Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Retrieved 2010-12-12. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Wahhabi Kafir". GlobalSecurity.org. 2005-04-27. Archived frae the oreeginal on 2005-05-07. Retrieved 2008-05-10.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "global" defined multiple times wi different content
  3. PBS Frontline. "Analyses - Wahhabism". Retrieved 27 January 2012. For more than two centuries, Wahhabism has been Saudi Arabia's dominant faith. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Esposito 2003, p. 333
  5. Washington Post, For Conservative Muslims, Goal of Isolation a Challenge
  6. John L. Esposito, What Everyone Needs to Know About Islam, p.50
  7. « Saudi Wahhabism is the most dangerous religious currents », El Khabar Ousbouî, 30 août 2010