Sultanate o Rum

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Sultanate o Seljuq
سلجوقیان روم
Saljūqiyān-i Rūm
1077–1307
Expansion o the Sultanate in c.1100-1240.
Expansion o the Sultanate in c.1100-1240.
Status Sultanate
Caipital Nicaea (İznik)
Iconium (Konya)
Common leids Persian (offeecial & leeteratur)[1][2]
Auld Anatolian Turkish[3]
Sultans  
• 1060–1077
Kutalmish
• 1303–1308
Mesud II
History  
1077
1307
Aurie
1243 400,000 km2 (150,000 sq mi)
Precedit bi
Succeedit bi
Great Seljuq Empire
Danishmends
Mengujekids
Saltukids
Artukids
Anatolian Beyliks
Ottoman Empire
Ilkhanate
Armenian Kinrick o Cilicia

The Sultanate o Rum or Seljuk Sultanate o Rum (Persie: سلجوقیان روم‎, Saljūqiyān-i Rūm, Modren Turkis: Anadolu Selçuklu Devleti or Rum Sultanlığı) wis a medieval Turko-Persian,[4] Sunni Muslim[5] state in Anatolie. It existit frae 1077 tae 1307, wi caipitals first at İznik an then at Konya. Syne the court o the sultanate wis heichly mobile, ceeties lik Kayseri an Sivas an aa functioned at times as caipitals. At its hicht, the sultanate stretched athort central Anatolie, frae the shoreline o Antalya an Alanya on the Mediterranean coast tae the territory o Sinop on the Black Sea. In the east, the sultanate absorbed ither Turkis states an reached Loch Van. Its wastrenmaist leemit wis near Denizli an the gates o the Aegean basin.

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. Grousset, Rene, The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia, (Rutgers University Press, 2002), 157; "...the Seljuk court at Konya adopted Persian as its official language.".
  2. Bernard Lewis, Istanbul and the Civilization of the Ottoman Empire, (University of Oklahoma Press, 1963), 29; "The literature of Seljuk Anatolia was almost entirely in Persian...".
  3. Encyclopedia Britannica: "Modern Turkish is the descendant of Ottoman Turkish and its predecessor, so-called Old Anatolian Turkish, which was introduced into Anatolia by the Seljuq Turks in the late 11th century ad." [1]
  4. Bernard Lewis, Istanbul and the Civilization of the Ottoman Empire, 29; "Even when the land of Rum became politically independent, it remained a colonial extension of Turco-Persian culture which had its centers in Iran and Central Asia","The literature of Seljuk Anatolia was almost entirely in Persian...".
  5. Institutionalisation of Science in the Medreses of pre-Ottoman and Ottoman Turkey, Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, Turkish Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, ed. Gürol Irzik, Güven Güzeldere, (Springer, 2005), 266.