Wastren Ukraine

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Wastren Ukraine

Several Oblasts can be referred tae as "Wastren Ukraine" the day:
  Red - aye includit
  Brown - aften includit
  Orange - sometimes includit
Tradeetional wastren pairt o Ukraine, markit in orange
Soviet annexation o territory o eastren Poland cedit tae Ukrainian SSR (yellae), 1940. Romanie Cernăuţi (nou Chernivtsi) in daurk green
Admeenistrative map o Poland, 1930. See: sooth-eastren regions (pink/beige)

Wastren Ukraine or Wast Ukraine (Ukrainian: Західна Україна) is a geographical an historical relative term uised in reference tae the wastren territories o Ukraine. Important ceeties are Chernivtsi, Halych (hence - Halychyna), Ivano-Frankivsk, Khotyn, Lutsk, Lviv, Rivne, Ternopil, Uzhhorod an ithers.

Wastren Ukraine is no a admeenistrative category athin Ukraine. It is defined mainly in the context o European history pertainin tae the 20t century wars an the ensuin period o annexations. The current oblast admeenistration borders are amaist perfectly aligned wi the admeenistrative diveesions o the Seicont Pols Republic frae afore the 1939 invasion o Poland bi the Soviet Union. At the onset o Warld War II the region wis incorporatit intae the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (УРСР),[1][2][3][4] follaein mock elections which manufactured public consent for the transfer o laund frae occupee'd Poland tae the Soviet Union as o 22 October 1939.[5] Its historical backgrund maks Wastren Ukraine uniquely different frae the rest o the kintra, an contributes tae its distinctive character o the day.[6]

Notes an references[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. Jan T. Gross (2002). "Western Ukraine". Revolution from Abroad: The Soviet Conquest of Poland's Western Ukraine. Princeton University Press. pp. 48 / 99 / 114. ISBN 0691096031. Retrieved February 27, 2013. 
  2. Myron Weiner, Sharon Stanton Russell (June 1, 2001). "Western Ukraine". Demography and National Security. Berghahn Books. pp. 313 / 322. ISBN 157181339X. Retrieved February 27, 2013. 
  3. Philipp Ther, Ana Siljak (2001). "Forced Migration from Poland's Former Eastern Territories". Redrawing Nations. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 136–. ISBN 0742510948. Retrieved February 27, 2013. 
  4. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named SerhyYUBoaMN
  5. Alfred J. Rieber (2013). Forced Migration in Central and Eastern Europe, 1939-1950. Routledge. p. 30. ISBN 1135274827. Retrieved 27 January 2014. 
  6. Rudolph Joseph Rummel (1996). Lethal Politics: Soviet Genocides and Mass Murders Since 1917 (Google Books preview). Transaction Publishers. p. 129. ISBN 1412827507. Retrieved 28 January 2014.