Wikipedia:Scots-English-Scots dictionar

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Fowk shuid keep this dictionar in alphabetical order (A, AA, AAB, AC an so on), uisin RRSSC. Mind that thare's airtins til the RRSSC leets o common wirds at the end o the page. Thir pages micht be mair helpfu gin ye ken a common Inglis wird but ye canna think on the Scots ane for it, but ye aye hiv tae be awaur o the fact as weill that Scots an English shares up tae 80 or 90% o the same lexicon (includin close cognates).[1]

Slang (words the likes o Irvine Welsh uises) can be fund at Scots slang.

A[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • A (I)
  • Aboot (Physically about, Approximately, Around)
  • Abuin (Above)
  • Ae (adjectival form of Ane, One)
  • Afore (Before)
  • Aff (Off)
  • Agley (Off line, astray) (rarely used, but well known from a famous Burns poem)
  • Ahint (Behind)
  • Aik (Oak) (cf Dutch eik)
  • Ain (Own, adj. n.) see awn
  • Aiple, Epple (Apple)
  • Airticle (Article)
  • Aiya, (ouch!) (Expression of pain or distress)
  • Allou (Allow)
  • Amang (Among(st))
  • An (And)
  • Ane (Noun form of One, also pronounced yin, wan or een depending on dialect)
  • Anent (Logically About, Concerning, on the subject of) (more literary than spoken)
  • 'ithin (Within)
  • Athort (Across, Over) (rarely used, Ower is the normal word for this in Scots)
  • Atween, Atwein (Between)
  • Auld (Old)
  • Aw (All)
  • Awbidy (Everyone)
  • Awfy (Awful, Very, Terrible)
  • Awhing (Everthing)
  • Awn (to possess)
  • Aye (Still, Always)
  • Ay (Yes)

B[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Bairn (Child) (see Wean)
  • Baith (Both)
  • Bam, Bampot (Crazy person, Maniac)
  • Bane (Bone)
  • Bap (bread roll) (bap is more NE or Ulster Scots, word is also used in parts of England[2] and Wales,[3] roll of bread is more the norm in anglicised central Scotland)
  • Barrae (Wheelbarrow)
  • Barkit (Dirty)
  • Batters (Cover - for a Book)
  • Bak (bake)
  • Baxter (baker archaic)
  • Bealin (Very angry)
  • Ben (Mountain in Scotland) (Gaelic loanword)
  • Beuk (Book)
  • Bere (Barley)
  • Besom (Floor brush, unpleasant adult female, can be a fond term for a mischievous female child as in "you're a wee besom")
  • Bide (stay at, live at, remain)
  • Bidie-in (a co-habitant, particularly a live-in sexual partner)
  • Bing (Heap, Pile, Coal tip)
  • Big (Build)
  • Biggin (Building)
  • Birk (Birch tree)
  • Birlin (Spinning)
  • Blate (Shy)
  • Blaw (Blow)
  • Blether (Babble, Talk Nonsense)
  • Bluid (Blood)
  • Bonny, Bonnie (Beautiful) (Often used about attractive younger females, She's a bonnie lassie and about Scotland)
  • Bonxie (Great Skua) (mainly in Insular Scots spoken over bird's natural habitat range)
  • Bowk (throw up, pronounced boke in some dialects)
  • Bowfin (Disgusting)
  • Brae (steep hill)
  • Braid (Broad)
  • Bridie (Meaty pastry originally produced in the Forfar area)
  • Braw (Fine, Handsome)
  • Bree (Soup)
  • Breid (Bread)
  • Breeks (Trousers)
  • Brewster (Brewer, archaic)
  • Brig (Bridge) (cf Dutch brug)
  • Brock (badger)
  • Bunnet (flat cap, often made from tweed fabric, and now other hats in general)
  • Burn (stream)
  • Butterie (North East word for a buttery bread roll)
  • Byke (Bees or Wasps nest, Hive)
  • Byle (Boil)
  • Byre (Cow shed)

C[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Caw (to Call, to Drive something over or in)
  • Caipital (Capital)
  • Cairt (Map)
  • Canna (Can't)
  • Cannie (Careful, skilful)
  • Carse (River bank land, flood plain)
  • Cauld (Cold)
  • Ceety (City)
  • Chap (Knock)
  • teuchter (pejorative for Country person or Highlander, Bumpkin)
  • Claes (Clothes)
  • Clart (coat, cover) She clartit her piece wi jam; He clartit himsel wi dubs.
  • Clarty (extremely dirty -- as if coated with mud)
  • Cleg (gadfly)
  • Cleuch, (Gorge, Ravine)
  • Cloot (cloth)
  • Clout, Clowt (strike, hit, a nail)
  • Cludgie (Slang for lavatory)
  • Clype (Tell tale) (cf Flemish klappen)
  • Cou (Cow)
  • Coont (Count)
  • Corbie (Raven)
  • Corn (Oats)
  • Couthie (Agreeable, Comfortable)
  • Cowp (Tip over)
  • Craitur (Creature)
  • Crabbit (Bad tempered)
  • Crack(Chat, Banter) (primarily Ulster Scots but Aiberdeen awa fowk aften caws the crack)
  • Craw (Crow)
  • Cry (Call, Name)
  • Cuddie (Donkey, wee horse)

D[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Dae (Do)
  • Daft (Silly, Foolish)
  • Deith (Death - can have Strae added if a Natural Death)
  • Dee'd (Died)
  • Deid (Dead)
  • Deif (Deaf)
  • Deaved (Deafened, Bored)
  • Deuk (Duck)
  • Delite (Delight) (not "Delicht" as non-native speakers sometimes think based on false analogy)
  • Didna (did not)
  • Dinna (do not)
  • Disna (does not)
  • Div (NE emphatic form of Dae)
  • Dicht (Clean)
  • Dochter (Daughter)
  • Doitit (Senile)
  • Dou (Pigeon)
  • Douk (a swim, dipping in water as a duck)
  • Doun (down)
  • Doun the stair (downstairs) (note Scots uses the singular unlike English)
  • Dour (Sullen, Grim, Stern)
  • Dreich (Dull) (often used in connection with the weather or the landscape)
  • Droukit (soaking wet)
  • Drouth (thirst)
  • Dubs (Puddles)
  • Dug (Dog)
  • Dunderheid (Idiot, One of Slow Wit)
  • Dunt (Hit or knock)
  • Dwaum (Swoon, Fainting spell, Daydream)
  • Dyke (Wall)

E[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • East (East)
  • Easter (Eastern particularly in traditional Scots placenames)
  • Emmers (Embers)
  • Erse (Irish, archaic)
  • Expone (expound, explain)

F[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Fae (From~ whit folk says in spoken Scots)
  • Faimily (Family)
  • Fair (Quite)
  • Faither (Father)
  • Fantasy (Fantasy)
  • Fank (Sheep Fold) (Gaelic Loanword)
  • Fankle (Becoming entangled, an entanglement or tricky situation)
  • Faw (Fall)
  • Fecht (Fight)
  • Fuil (fool, Crazy)
  • Ferm (Farm)
  • Finger (Finger) (soft rather than a hard "g" in Scots as in German)
  • Fitbaw (Football)
  • Fluir (Floor)
  • Flee (Fly)
  • Flech (Flea)
  • Frae (From~ archaeic an leeterar Scots form)
  • Fowk(Folk, People, pronounced foke in some dialects) (Used where English speakers tend to say "People", marked regional difference in pronounciation is not always related to Anglicising trend in modern speech)
  • Forenuin (Forenoon)
  • Forfochten (Tired Out)
  • Forgaither (forgather)
  • Fou (full), suffix -fu
  • Foostie (Decayed, Gone off)
  • Fouter (Fiddle about, Tamper with)
  • Fower (Four)
  • Fykie (Fussy, Complicated)

G[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Gadg(i)e (Guy) (Romany loanword)
  • Gae, Gan(g) (Go)
  • Gallus (Daring, Cheeky, Impish)
  • Gailey (Ship, archaic) (Ship is a traditional Scots word as well as an English one)
  • Gairden (Garden)
  • Gate (Road, way)
  • Gean (Wild cherry tree)
  • Gemm (Game)
  • Gey (Very)
  • Ghaist (Ghost)
  • Gie (Give)
  • Glaikit (foolish, daft)
  • Glaur (Wet mud, Clay)
  • Glebe (Land attached to a kirk for use by the minister)
  • Gloamin (Twilight)
  • Glower (Frown)
  • Gowan (Daisy)
  • Greet (Cry, Weep)
  • Grund (Ground)
  • Guddle (Catching fish by hand in a stream)
  • Guff (Bad smell)
  • Gutties (training or gym shoes, running shoes, sneakers) (perhaps from gutta percha?)
  • Guid (Good)
  • Guidbrither (Brother-in-Law)
  • Guidfaither (Father-in-Law)
  • Guidman (Husband archaic now usually just "ma Man" for "my husband")
  • Guidwife (Wife archaic)

H[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Haw (A large manor, a "Hall")
  • Haar (Thick mist, usually cold, typically blowing in from the sea)
  • Hae (Have)
  • Haiver(Talk Nonsense)
  • Haver (The oat)
  • Hale (Whole)
  • Halesome (Nutritious)
  • Hame (home)
  • Hauch (Low lying ground in a river's flood plane, meadow)(-gh spelling tends to be used in placenames)
  • Haud (Hold)
  • Hauf (Half)
  • Haund, Haunds (Hands)
  • Heich, Hie (High) (guttural sound unusual in modern speech)
  • Heid (Head)
  • Heider (Header (football))
  • Hielands (Highlands)
  • Hen (Hen, chicken meat)
  • Hing (Hang)
  • Hippin (Nappy, Diaper)
  • Hiv (Have emphatic) (particularly in central belt)
  • Hotchin (Heaving, adjectival description of a busy location)
  • Hou?, Hou come? (see Whit wey?)
  • Hoose, (House)
  • Howff (Pub, Shelter, a favourite place to hang out; a burial ground)
  • Howk (Dig particularly used for harvest of potatoes, pronounced hoke in some dialects)
  • Humph (Hump, Carry a heavy load)
  • Hurl (Go for a ride, e.g. Gaun for a hurl in the caur.)

I[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Inch (Small Island/Isle) (Gaelic Loanword)
  • Indwaller (Inhabitant)
  • Ingan (Onion)
  • Innin (Introduction)
  • Intae, Intil (into)

J[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Jag (Prick, Injection)
  • Jaiket (Jacket, The meaning Drunk/Intoxicated, as in "he's well jaikit him" is from jaik a large tin mug, a drinking vessel.
  • Jalouse (Guess, Suspect)
  • Jeely, (Jam)
  • Jings (a mild exclamation, an expression of suprise. 'Crivens, Jings and help ma boab' is an old Scots version of 'Heavens, Jesus and Help me God')
  • Jink (Dodge, Turn quickly)
  • Jouk (to duck)
  • Juice (Carbonated drink, soda)
  • Jyner (Carpenter, Joiner)

K[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Kail (Cabbage) (cf Dutch kool)
  • Kenspeckle (Prominent)
  • Keek(Peep, Look at, Glimpse) (cf Dutch kijk)
  • Ken (Know, to know) (cf Dutch kennen)
  • Kent (Knew)
  • Kintra (Country)
  • Kirk (Church) (often reserved for the Church of Scotland with Chaipel used for Roman Catholic churches instead which is sometimes viewed as a mild perjorative) (cf Dutch kerk)
  • Kist (Chest) (cf Dutch kist)
  • Knowe (Knoll)
  • Kye (Cattle)

L[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Lad(-die) (Boy, young man) (Angus and NE fowk says Loun)
  • Lade (Channel to lead water to a mill)
  • Laich (Low)
  • Lairge (Large)
  • Learn(Learn, Teach) (Note a key difference in idiom here from English, That will learn them is Scots for "that will teach them a lesson")
  • Laldie (Thrashing or punishment originally, now used in phrase Gie it laldie! similar to "Give it Hell" in English)
  • Lang (Long) (of a boy or man - tall, e.g. Lang Johnie)
  • Lass(-ie) (Girl, young woman) (NE fowk says quine)
  • Laverock (Lark)
  • Lea (Meadow, Pasture)
  • Leed (Language
  • Leid' (Lead metal)
  • Leet (List of candidates, still used formally in job interviews)
  • Leuk (Look)
  • Licht (Light, Lamp)
  • Linn (Waterfal)
  • Loan (Lane)
  • Loun(Boy, Man) (NE Wird)
  • Lowp (Jump)
  • Lugs (Ears)
  • Lum (Chimney)

M[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Ma (My)
  • Mairch (Borders)(This is cognate with 'march' in older English, 'Mark' in German, 'Marche' region in Italian.)
  • Mair (More)
  • Maist (Most)
  • Mak (Make) (Note that Made is a traditional Scots verb form for the past tense as well as Makkit)
  • Makar (archaeic), Makker (maker, a poet or bard, particularly for literary figures from the 15th and 16th centuries)
  • Masel (Myself)
  • Maukit(Dirty, Unclean)
  • Maun (Must) (Neither maun nor must is used very often by native Scots Speakers, hae tae or need tae is used to denote an obligation instead, the use of maun/must is usually reserved to conclusive conditions and even then is not particularly common)
  • Mavis (Song thrush)
  • Member-s, (Member)
  • Mercat (Market)
  • Messages (Shopping, Errands)
  • Mey (May) (Neither mey nor may is used very often as a verb by native Scots Speakers, Mebbe or Mebbes for maybe is usually combined with the verb to go/tae Gae to form a conditional future tense instead, Can is preferred in forming questions)
  • Mebbe, Mebbes (Maybe, Perhaps)
  • Mynd (o) (Remember)
  • Ming (Unpleasant odour)
  • Midge (Gnat)
  • Mirk (Darkness)
  • Mither (Mother)
  • Mony (Many)
  • Monyfauld (Numerous)
  • Morra (Morrow, The Morra means Tomorrow)
  • Muckle (Much) (Peerie and Muckle is uised for smaw an big in Insular Scots)
  • Muckin (cleaning)
  • Meikle (form of muckle -Large) (Particularly in traditional Scots placenames e.g. Meikle and Little Earnock in Hamilton, a phrase people repeat that mony a mickle maks a muckle is actually gibberish because puckle was replaced by Mickle.[4] People in the NE say mony a puckle maks a muckle.)
    In Caribbean Inglis, the expression becomes 'every mikkle mek a mukkle'.[5]
  • Muir (Moor)

N[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • No,Nae (Not)
  • No Fair (Unfair)
  • Nane (None)
  • Naw (No)
  • Neep (Turnip)(some people claim that Neep refers to swedes in Scots rather than turnips [6] and Tumshie is used for turnips)
  • Neb (Nose)
  • Ned (Juvenile Delinquent)
  • Nether (Lower) (Very common in traditional Scots placenames) (cf Dutch neder-, neer- | Netherlands = Nederland)
  • Neuk (Corner)
  • Nicht (Night)
  • Niver (Never)
  • Novelle (Novel - as in the beuk)
  • Nowt (cattle) (mainly a NE word, Kye is mair common as collective plural for cou)
  • Nyaff (Annoying person)

O[eedit | eedit soorce]

(Auld Scots orthography haed "ou" for an /u/ ("oo") sound (vouel 6). The phonetic "oo" spellin wis borraed fae English for tae mak fowk unaquent wi Scots soond it richt.)

  • O (Of)
  • Oor (Hour)
  • Ourie (Eerie)
  • Oo, oose (Wool, wooly as in thick fluffy dust)
  • Oot o (Out of)
  • Ootstaundin (Prominent)
  • Ootwi (Outside, without)
  • Ower(Across, Over, Too, the Anglicised form "Over" is often used even in Scottish Standard English for "Too" as well as in modified traditional placenames for Upper usually contrasting with Nether for Lower)
  • Oxter (Arm pit) (cf Dutch oksel)

P[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Pape (Pope, also used as a mildly perjorative term for Roman Catholics)
  • Paps (Female breasts)
  • Pairk (park, enclosed Field)
  • Pairt (Part)
  • Panlaif (panloaf, Scots speakers mildly perjorative name for Morningside style Scottish Standard English)
  • Parritch (Porridge)
  • Partan (Crab)
  • Paitrick (Patridge)
  • Pecht oot (Out of breath)
  • Peelie-wallie (Sick, pale)
  • Peerie (Small) (Insular and Caithness(?) Scots)
  • Peevers (Hop Scotch)
  • Piece (Packed Lunch, Sandwich)
  • Pinkie (Small Finger)
  • Pish (Piss)
  • Plouks(Pimples)
  • Ploum(Plum)
  • Plou (Plough)
  • Poke (Bag particularly of sweets or chips, Sack)
  • Polis (Police) (NE slang The Bobbys, Ulster Scots slang Peelers)
  • Puckle (an imprecise amount; a few)
  • Polite (Polite)
  • Puggie (Monkey, One-armed bandit, (Cash)Maschine, Go-Kart)
  • Puir (Poor)
  • Plunk (Set down)
  • Propone (Propose)
  • Puddock (Toad) (cf Dutch pad)

Q[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Quean (Girl, Young woman, pronounced quine in the NE)

R[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Radge (Crazy) (Romany loanward?)
  • Rammie (Small scale disturbance or fight)
  • Redd (Tidy up)
  • Reek (Smoke) (cf Dutch rook)
  • Reid (Red)
  • Richt (Right, Real, Really, Proper)
  • Rig (Ridge, Field)
  • Rone (Roof gutter)
  • Rone-pipe (Drainpipe)
  • Rowp (sale/auction)
  • Wrocht (Worked)
  • Ruid (Cross)
  • Rummlin (Rumbling)

S[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Sair (Sore)
  • Sair Heid (Headache)
  • Sauch (Willow)(Found in placenames for low lying marshy areas)
  • Sal(l) (archaic) (neither shall nor sall is used very often by native Scots speakers, verb to go/tae Gae is used to form the future tense)
  • Sark (Shirt)
  • Schame (Scheme, Municipal housing estate, "the Projects")
  • Sclim(Climb)
  • Skoosh, (squirt) (skoosh case is slang for something easily accomplished)
  • Scran (Food)
  • Scunner (Annoyed, Disgust, object of disgust including person particularly small child)
  • Scrieve (Scratch, Scribble)
  • Sederunt (Those in attendence at a meeting, like Leet still in formal use in modern Scotland)
  • Semple (simple)
  • Shank (leg)
  • Shak (shake)
  • Shaw (Small wood, copse, dell)
  • Sheuch (Ditch) (still very commonly used in Ulster)
  • Shoud (Should) (in general in both Scots and Scottish Standard English most Scottish people use shoud much less frequently than English people do, Wad is preferred especially by native Scots speakers, Hae tae and Need tae is prefered for denoting obligation)
  • Shouders, Shouthers (Shoulders) (cf Dutch schouders)
  • Shoogly (shakey)
  • Skail (Spill, scatter, disperse particularly football crowd from old terraced standing areas)
  • Skelf (Splinter)
  • Skelp (Hit, Smack)
  • Skint (Skinned, Broke, poor)
  • Sleekit(Sly, Sneaky, Underhand)
  • Smirr (Fine rain, drizzle)
  • Snaw (Snow)
  • Sodger (Soldier)
  • Sooth (South)
  • Sonsie (Jolly, Plump)
  • Souk (Suck)
  • Soor (Sour)
  • Sowel (a person i.e soul, in the spiritual sense saul,puir wee sowel sometimes used for an unfortunate child)
  • Sparrae (Sparrow)
  • Speir (at) (inquire) (often used in a speir at so and so sort of way, Ask is also a traditional Scots word as well)
  • Speug(ie) (Sparrow)
  • Splore (Explore)
  • Stair (Stairs) (Note Scots uses the singular the stair where English uses the plural)
  • Stairtit (Started)
  • Staundart (Standard)
  • Stane (Stone)
  • Stank (Drains)
  • Stent (Extent)
  • Steamie (Public laundry, washhouse)
  • Steep (Soak)
  • Stey (Steep)
  • Stour (Dust)
  • Stot (bounce, as in a ball off the ground) (cf Dutch stuiten)
  • Stotter (An extreme example of its kind.)
  • Stotious (Drunk)
  • Stovies (Stewed potatoes)
  • Stowed oot (Absolutely packed with people)
  • Stramash (Uproar)
  • Strang (Strong)
  • Strynd (decent)

T[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Tae, Til (To)
  • Taes (Toes)
  • Tatties (Potatoes)
  • Tak (Take)
  • Teuchter (pejorative for Country person or Highlander, Bumpkin)
  • The Day (Today)
  • Thegither (Together)
  • The Morn (Tomorrow)
  • The Morn's Morn(in) (Tomorrow morning)
  • The Nicht (Tonight)
  • The Nou (Right now, Just now)
  • Thae (Those)
  • Thair (Their)
  • Thay (They)
  • Thare (there)
  • Thing (thing)
  • Think (think)
  • Thole (endure)
  • Thon (Scots uises This, That, Thon for the English "this", "that", "that one over there")
  • Thoum (Thumb)
  • Thrapple (Throat)
  • Thraw (throw)
  • Thrawn (thrown, Awkward, Troublesome particulay used about children)
  • Throu (Through, During)
  • Till (Until)
  • Tirlin Pin (type of door chapper where a metal ring is scratched on a fixed metal bar)
  • Toun (Town, also a group of farm buildings)
  • Tourie (pompon on a hat e.g. 'tourie bunnet' which is anothe name for hats similar to a Tam o Shanter hat)
  • Tumshie (Turnip)(see also Neep)
  • Troosers (Trousers)
  • Twa (two) (cf Dutch twee)

U[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Unce (Ounce)
  • Unco (Very, Extremely)
  • Unner (Under)
  • Up the stair (Upstairs) (note Scots uses the singular unlike English)

V[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Varsitie (University)
  • Verra (Very, negative: "Verra bad" no "Verra guid")(see Unco, Gey)

W[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Wabsteid (website-new English word) (new Scots word not adopted yet by most native speakers, most have limited exposure to written Scots beyond the annual Burns celebrations and Oor Wullie and The Broons[7] each week in the Sunday Post[8] and seldom read Scots publications)
  • Wabbit (Exhausted, weak)
  • Wad (Would)
  • Wallie (made of porcelain)
  • Wallies (False teeth)
  • Wastren (Western)
  • Wark n. wirk v. (work, or a building)
  • Wean (child) (contraction of "wee ane",[9] particularly common in Ulster Scots which is essentially part of wm.Sc.[10] and is even used by Hiberno-English speakers in parts of the RoI [11])
  • Wabster (Weaver)
  • Wee (Small, Little)
  • Waster (Wester, Western particularly in traditional Scots placenames)
  • Whaur (Where)
  • Wheesht (be quiet, silent as phrase "Haud yer wheesht!" often used with noisy children)
  • Whilk (Which, archaic, modern Scots uses Whit or That where English uses "Which") (cf Dutch welk)
  • Whins (Gorse, Furze)
  • Whit (What)
  • Whit Wey?, Hou Come?, Hou? (Why?)
  • Wi (With)
  • Wis (Was)
  • Wir (Our) (see also Oor)
  • Wisna (was not)
  • Write (Write)
  • Wirsels (ourselves)
  • Wey (Way)
  • Wynd (narrow winding street)

X[eedit | eedit soorce]

Y[eedit | eedit soorce]

  • Yer (Your)
  • Ye (You)
  • Yett (Gate)
  • Yit (yet, still, to this day)
  • Yon (That one over there) (essentially same meaning as Thon, often used to refer to something in the distance but still within eyesight of both people involved in conversation)
  • Yowe (Ewe)

Z[eedit | eedit soorce]

See forbye[eedit | eedit soorce]

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

Fremmit airtins[eedit | eedit soorce]