Fascism

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Fascism (play /ˈfæʃɪzəm/) is a radical authoritarian naitionalist poleetical ideology.[1][2] Fascists seek tae rejuvenate their naition based on commitment tae the naitional community as an organic entity, in which individuals are bund thegither in naitional identity bi suprapersonal connections o ancestry, cultur, an blood.[3] Tae achieve this, fascists purge forces, ideas, fowk, an seestems deemed tae be the cause o decadence an degeneration.[3] Fascists advocate the creation o a totalitarian single-pairty state that seeks the mass mobilization o a naition through indoctrination, pheesical education, discipline an family policy (such as eugenics).[4][5] That state is led bi a supreme leader who exercises a dictatorship ower the fascist muivement, the govrenment an ither state institutions.[6] Fascist govrenments forbid an suppress opposition.[7]

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. Turner, Henry Ashby, Reappraisals of Fascism. New Viewpoints, 1975. p. 162. States fascism's "goals of radical and authoritarian nationalism".
  2. Larsen, Stein Ugelvik, Bernt Hagtvet and Jan Petter Myklebust, Who were the Fascists: Social Roots of European Fascism, p. 424, "organized form of integrative radical nationalist authoritarianism"
  3. 3.0 3.1 Blamires, Cyprian, World Fascism: a Historical Encyclopedia, Volume 1 (Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 2006) pp. 140-141.
  4. Grčić, Joseph. Ethics and Political Theory (Lanham, Maryland: University of America, Inc, 2000) p. 120
  5. Blamires, Cyprian, World Fascism: a Historical Encyclopedia, Volume 1 (Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 2006) p. 670.
  6. Bhushan, Vidya, Comparative Politics, 3rd ed. (New Delhi, India: Atlantic Publishers, 2006) p. 208.
  7. Kent, Allen, Harold Lancour and William Z. Nasri, Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science: Volume 62, Supplement 25, Automated Discourse Generation to the User-Centered Revolution: 1970–1995. (CRC Press, 1998) ISBN 978-0-8247-2062-9, p. 69.