Vega

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Vega
Vega in lyra.svg
Location of Vega in the constellation Lyra
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Lyra
Pronunciation /ˈvɡə/
or /ˈvɡə/
Richt ascension 18h 36m 56.33635s[1]
Declination +38° 47′ 01.2802″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 0.03[2] (−0.02 - 0.07[3])
Characteristics
Spectral teep A0Va[2]
U−B colour index −0.01[2]
B−V colour index +0.00[2]
Variable teep Delta Scuti[4]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) 13.9 ± 0.9[5] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 200.94[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 286.23[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 130.23 ± 0.36[1] mas
Distance 25.04 ± 0.07 ly
(7.68 ± 0.02 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 0.58[note 1]
Details
Mass 2.135 ± 0.074[6] M
Radius 2.362 × 2.818[6] R
Luminosity 40.12 ± 0.45[6] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.1 & 0.1[7] cgs
Temperatur 9,602 ± 180[8] (8,152–10,060 K)[6] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] −0.5[8] dex
Rotation 12.5 h
Rotational velocity (v sin i) 20.48 ± 0.11[6] km/s
Age 455 ± 13[6] Myr
Ither designations
Wega,[9] Lucida Lyrae,[10] Alpha Lyrae, α Lyrae, 3 Lyr, BD +38°3238, GCTP 4293.00, HD 172167, GJ 721, HIP 91262, HR 7001, LTT 15486, SAO 67174,[2] 织女一
Database references
SIMBAD data

Vega (α Lyr, α Lyrae, Alpha Lyrae) is the brichtest starn in the constellation Lyra, the fift brichtest starn in the nicht sky an the seicont brichtest starn in the northren celestial hemisphere, efter Arcturus.

Notes[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. For apparent magnitude m an parallax π, the absolute magnitude Mv is gien bi:
    See: Tayler, Roger John (1994), The Stars: Their Structure and Evolution, Cambridge University Press, p. 16, ISBN 0-521-45885-4 

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 van Leeuwen, F. (November 2007), "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction", Astronomy and Astrophysics, 474 (2): 653–664, arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible, Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Staff, "V* alf Lyr – Variable Star", SIMBAD, Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg, retrieved 2007-10-30 —use the "display all measurements" option to show additional parameters.
  3. Samus, N. N.; Durlevich, O. V.; et al. (2009). "VizieR Online Data Catalog: General Catalogue of Variable Stars (Samus+ 2007–2013)". VizieR On-line Data Catalog: B/gcvs. Originally published in: 2009yCat....102025S. 1: 02025. Bibcode:2009yCat....102025S. 
  4. Fernie, J. D. (1981), "On the variability of Vega", Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 93 (2): 333–337, Bibcode:1981PASP...93..333F, doi:10.1086/130834 
  5. Evans, D. S. (Juin 20–24, 1966), "The Revision of the General Catalogue of Radial Velocities", Proceedings from IAU Symposium no. 30, London, England: Academic Press, p. 57, Bibcode:1967IAUS...30...57E 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 Yoon, Jinmi; et al. (Januar 2010), "A New View of Vega's Composition, Mass, and Age", The Astrophysical Journal, 708 (1): 71–79, Bibcode:2010ApJ...708...71Y, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/708/1/71 
  7. Aufdenberg, J.P.; et al. (2006), "First results from the CHARA Array: VII. Long-Baseline Interferometric Measurements of Vega Consistent with a Pole-On, Rapidly Rotating Star?", Astrophysical Journal, 645 (1): 664–675, arXiv:astro-ph/0603327Freely accessible, Bibcode:2006ApJ...645..664A, doi:10.1086/504149 
  8. 8.0 8.1 Kinman, T.; et al. (2002), "The determination of Teff for metal-poor A-type stars using V and 2MASS J, H and K magnitudes", Astronomy and Astrophysics, 391 (3): 1039–1052, Bibcode:2002A&A...391.1039K, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20020806 
  9. Allen, Richard Hinckley (1963), Star Names: Their Lore and Meaning, Courier Dover Publications, ISBN 0-486-21079-0 
  10. Kendall, E. Otis (1845), Uranography: Or, A Description of the Heavens; Designed for Academics and Schools; Accompanied by an Atlas of the Heavens, Philadelphia: Oxford University Press 

Coordinates: Sky map 18h 36m 56.3364s, +38° 47′ 01.291″