Andromeda Galaxy

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Andromeda Galaxy
Andromeda Galaxy (with h-alpha).jpg
The Andromeda Galaxy
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
Constellation Andromeda
Richt ascension 00h 42m 44.3s[1]
Declination +41° 16′ 9″[1]
Redshift z = −0.001001
(minus sign
indicates blueshift)[1]
Helio radial velocity −301 ± 1 km/s[2]
Distance 2.54 ± 0.11 Mly
(778 ± 33 kpc)[2][3][4][5][6][lower-alpha 1]
Teep SA(s)b[1]
Mass ~1.5×1012[7] M
Size (ly) ~220 kly (diameter)[8]
Nummer o starns ~1 trillion (1012)[9]
Apparent dimensions (V) 3.167° × 1°[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 3.44[10][11]
Absolute magnitude (V) −21.5[lower-alpha 2][4]
Ither designations
M31, NGC 224, UGC 454, PGC 2557, 2C 56 (Core),[1] CGCG 535-17, MCG +07-02-016, IRAS 00400+4059, 2MASX J00424433+4116074, GC 116, h 50, Bode 3, Flamsteed 58, Hevelius 32, Ha 3.3, IRC +40013
See an aa: Galaxy, Leet o galaxies

The Andromeda Galaxy (an aa kent as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, is a spiral galaxy approximately 780 kiloparsecs (2.5 million licht-years) frae Yird.[4]

Notes[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. average(787 ± 18, 770 ± 40, 772 ± 44, 783 ± 25) = ((787 + 770 + 772 + 783) / 4) ± (182 + 402 + 442 + 252)0.5 / 2 = 778 ± 33.
  2. Blue absolute magnitude o −20.89 – Colour index o 0.63 = −21.52

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 "Results for Messier 31". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. NASA/IPAC. Retrieved 2006-11-01. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Karachentsev, I. D.; Kashibadze, O. G. (2006). "Masses of the local group and of the M81 group estimated from distortions in the local velocity field". Astrophysics. 49 (1): 3–18. Bibcode:2006Ap.....49....3K. doi:10.1007/s10511-006-0002-6. 
  3. Karachentsev, I. D.; et al. (2004). "A Catalog of Neighboring Galaxies". Astronomical Journal. 127 (4): 2031–2068. Bibcode:2004AJ....127.2031K. doi:10.1086/382905. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Ribas, I.; et al. (2005). "First Determination of the Distance and Fundamental Properties of an Eclipsing Binary in the Andromeda Galaxy". Astrophysical Journal Letters. 635 (1): L37–L40. arXiv:astro-ph/0511045Freely accessible. Bibcode:2005ApJ...635L..37R. doi:10.1086/499161. 
  5. McConnachie, A. W.; et al. (2005). "Distances and metallicities for 17 Local Group galaxies". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 356 (4): 979–997. arXiv:astro-ph/0410489Freely accessible. Bibcode:2005MNRAS.356..979M. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2004.08514.x. 
  6. Jensen, J. B.; et al. (2003). "Measuring Distances and Probing the Unresolved Stellar Populations of Galaxies Using Infrared Surface Brightness Fluctuations". Astrophysical Journal. 583 (2): 712–726. arXiv:astro-ph/0210129Freely accessible. Bibcode:2003ApJ...583..712J. doi:10.1086/345430. 
  7. Jorge Peñarrubia; Yin-Zhe Ma; Matthew G. Walker; Alan McConnachie (29 Julie 2014). "A dynamical model of the local cosmic expansion". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 433 (3): 2204–2022. arXiv:1405.0306Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014MNRAS.443.2204P. doi:10.1093/mnras/stu879. 
  8. Chapman, S. C.; et al. (2006). "A kinematically selected, metal-poor spheroid in the outskirts of M31". Astrophysical Journal. 653 (1): 255–266. arXiv:astro-ph/0602604Freely accessible. Bibcode:2006ApJ...653..255C. doi:10.1086/508599.  Also see the press release, "Andromeda's Stellar Halo Shows Galaxy's Origin to Be Similar to That of Milky Way" (Press release). Caltech Media Relations. Februar 27, 2006. Archived frae the oreeginal on 9 Mey 2006. Retrieved 2006-05-24. 
  9. Young, K. (Juin 6, 2006). "The Andromeda galaxy hosts a trillion stars". New Scientist. Retrieved 2014-10-06. 
  10. "SIMBAD-M31". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Retrieved 2009-11-29. 
  11. Armando, G. P.; et al. (2007). "The GALEX Ultraviolet Atlas of Nearby Galaxies". Astrophysical Journal. 173 (2): 185–255. arXiv:astro-ph/0606440Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007ApJS..173..185G. doi:10.1086/516636. 

Coordinates: Sky map 00h 42m 44.3s, +41° 16′ 10″