Al 'Aziziyah

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Al Aziziyah is a city in northwestern Libya. It's population was 4,000 as of 2009.

Geography an climate[eedit | eedit soorce]

On 13 September 1922, a high temperature of 57.8°C (136°F) was recorded in Al 'Aziziyah, which is the highest temperature ever measured on Earth.[1][2]

However, that reading is controversial:[3][4]

  1. The weather station was at first in Al Aziziyah town, but in 1919 it was moved to a hilltop fort, where the weather station was set up on black tarmac, which absorbed the sunlight and made the air there artificially hotter, explaining a period of very hot readings there from 1919 to 1928.
  2. Shortly before the 13 September 1922 record reading, the weather station's usual maximum thermometer had been damaged, and replaced by a calibrated ordinary maximum-minimum thermometer such as often used in greenhouses.

This record does not mean that Al 'Aziziyah is the hottest place on Earth; that title belongs to Dallol, Ethiopia, where the mean temperature is 34.4°C (94°F). If the record was not the actual temperature, then the hottest temperature is 56.7°C (134°F) which has been recorded in 1913 in Death Valley in the United States.

Climate data for Al 'Aziziyah, Libya(2015)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record heich °C (°F) 38.1
(100.6)
42.5
(108.5)
49.5
(121.1)
52.3
(126.1)
54.5
(130.1)
54.9
(130.8)
56.0
(132.8)
63.0
(145.4)
66.4
(151.5)
53.8
(128.8)
42.1
(107.8)
42.0
(107.6)
66.4
(151.5)
Source: http://www.wunderground.com/blog/weatherhistorian/comment.html?entrynum=2</ref>

Notes[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. "Global Measured Extremes of Temperature and Precipitation". National Climatic Data Center. United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Retrieved 3 December 2008. 
  2. "What is the highest temperature recorded on Earth, and what's a reasonable upper limit on the Earth's temperature?". Goddard Space Flight Center. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Retrieved 6 September 2009. [deid airtin]
  3. "Broken thermometer led to a record breaker". Daily Telegraph. 13 November 2010. 
  4. Burt, Christopher C. (2010-10-08). "QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE WORLD’S HOTTEST TEMPERATURE ON RECORD: 136.4°F (66°C) AT AL AZIZIA, LIBYA SEPTEMBER 13, 1922". Weather Underground. Retrieved 2010-10-09. 

Coordinates: 32°31′51″N 13°01′16″E / 32.53083°N 13.02111°E / 32.53083; 13.02111