Sultanate o Rum

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Sultanate o Seljuq
سلجوقیان روم
Saljūqiyān-i Rūm
Sultanate

1077–1307
 

 

Expansion o the Sultanate in c.1100-1240.
Caipital Nicaea (İznik)
Iconium (Konya)
Leid(s) Persian (offeecial & leeteratur)[1][2]
Auld Anatolian Turkish[3]
Political structure Sultanate
Sultans
 − 1060–1077 Kutalmish
 − 1303–1308 Mesud II
History
 - Diveesion frae the Great Seljuq Empire 1077
 - Internal struggles 1307
Aurie
 − 1243 400,000 km2 (154,441 sq mi)

The Sultanate o Rum or Seljuk Sultanate o Rum (Persian: سلجوقیان روم, Saljūqiyān-i Rūm, Modren Turkis: Anadolu Selçuklu Devleti or Rum Sultanlığı) wis a medieval Turko-Persian,[4] Sunni Muslim[5] state in Anatolie. It existit frae 1077 tae 1307, wi caipitals first at İznik an then at Konya. Syne the court o the sultanate wis heichly mobile, ceeties lik Kayseri an Sivas an aa functioned at times as caipitals. At its hicht, the sultanate stretched athort central Anatolie, frae the shoreline o Antalya an Alanya on the Mediterranean coast tae the territory o Sinop on the Black Sea. In the east, the sultanate absorbed ither Turkis states an reached Loch Van. Its wastrenmaist leemit wis near Denizli an the gates o the Aegean basin.

References[eedit | eedit soorce]

  1. Grousset, Rene, The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia, (Rutgers University Press, 2002), 157; "...the Seljuk court at Konya adopted Persian as its official language.".
  2. Bernard Lewis, Istanbul and the Civilization of the Ottoman Empire, (University of Oklahoma Press, 1963), 29; "The literature of Seljuk Anatolia was almost entirely in Persian...".
  3. Encyclopedia Britannica: "Modern Turkish is the descendant of Ottoman Turkish and its predecessor, so-called Old Anatolian Turkish, which was introduced into Anatolia by the Seljuq Turks in the late 11th century ad." [1]
  4. Bernard Lewis, Istanbul and the Civilization of the Ottoman Empire, 29; "Even when the land of Rum became politically independent, it remained a colonial extension of Turco-Persian culture which had its centers in Iran and Central Asia","The literature of Seljuk Anatolia was almost entirely in Persian...".
  5. Institutionalisation of Science in the Medreses of pre-Ottoman and Ottoman Turkey, Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, Turkish Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, ed. Gürol Irzik, Güven Güzeldere, (Springer, 2005), 266.